How to Write Copy That Sells (Anything):Tips You Can Use Today


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Table of Contents

Let’s get one thing straight: If it’s not selling something, it’s not copy.

Any word or phrase you put in front of your audience sells some form of information at some form of a price to your readers, whether that’s their trust, time, effort, attention, clicks, or actual dollars.

This means that all of your copy—your home page, social posts, blogs, landing pages, product descriptions, mission statement—should always be selling.

But is it?

In this post, I’m going to use the five C’s formula to help you make sure it is. That means clear, concise, credible, compelling, and call to action(y).

But not just with five tips. No no. I’m coming at you with 25 tips and 72 examples so you can have what it really takes to write copy that sells. We’ll cover

Language and formatting tips to help you make clear points.
Easy grammatical fixes that result in concise but value-packed messaging.

Destructive mistakes and must-haves for true credibility.
Creative ideas and exercises to compel your readers.

Some tips may feel contradictory. But it all depends on what type of content you’re working with, where it lives in cyberspace, and what your purpose is. So just keep that in mind!

1. Make it easy to read

Copy that sells isn’t impressive. It’s easy. Your reader shouldn’t have to stop reading to make sense of what you’re saying, even if just for a nanosecond. The more your copy flows, the longer you’ll keep their attention and the easier it will be for them to get the important points you’re making.

Take a look at this public school’s copy, targeting public high schoolers and their parents.

We provide a multifaceted educational program to our students, using the most effective pedagogical approaches that intertwine progressive thinking skills, vocational events, and modular courses as deemed important by the educators and community.”

Now take a look at Harvard Business School copy, targeting [really] smart college grads:

See what I mean?

Note: Readable doesn’t necessarily mean removing fancy words. As long as you’re using terms your audience is familiar with, they’ll be able to move along. Which brings us to our next point. 

2. Use keywords (not just for SEO)

Although showing up on the first page of Google is a selling point in and of itself, you should also be using keywords everywhere—not just SEO copywriting. Remember, these are the words and phrases your audience is using. When you speak their language (and not yours), your copy will clearly convey the value of your offerings in a way that resonates with them.

For example, if you’re a web design/SEO provider for small business owners, this landing page copy will not sell:

We optimize all our websites for Google search using keyword-targeted metadata, lazy loading, and minified CSS.

These keywords would be easy reads if your clients were web design/SEO agencies looking to outsource their own. But for the small business owner audience, this is a better sell:

We make technical optimizations to speed up your website and use keyword-targeted content to help you rank higher on Google.

Keywords = their jargon, not yours.

3. Write FABulously

Did I just come up with the cheesiest thing ever? Yes. But do I secretly like it? Also yes. Copy that sells should always be answering these two questions: What’s in it for me and how do I know I’ll get it? And the key to this is writing with features and benefits in mind. Aka FABulously.

You know to use it in your product or pricing page copy:

But you can also use it in your blog posts:

And email subject lines:

4. Address objections directly

Feature-benefit copy may sell your reader on actions that move them through your funnel, but as they move closer to the actual dollar sale, they’re going to be putting more careful thought into their decision. Questions change from “what’s in it for me?” to “but what if…?” These objections (conscious or not) are barriers to selling. And while some aspects of your copy will organically speak to them, you should also directly addresses them somewhere.

Not only does this type of copy demonstrate transparency and an understanding of the customer, but it’s also a way to reinforce your features and benefits and show your subject matter expertise.

But in the name of being concise (which is our next section), reserve this copy for an FAQ section at the bottom of your landing pages with expandable sections, or its own blog post or page.

Image source

5. Use bullets and lists (strategically)

Wait! Before you skip over this one—there’s a strategy within the strategy. According to the serial position effect, people tend to recall the first and last items in a series the best. So when you’re using bullet points, make sure you place the MVPs accordingly.

This may be more applicable to longer lists, but here’s a small example.

If I only remember the first and last bullets, my clear takeaway from this webinar landing page is that I’m going to learn lead scoring best practices (feature) so I can understand my prospects’ engagement (benefit). Sweet.

How to write CONCISE copy that sells

A concise definition of concise: Uses fewer words to say more.

Concise copy brings an obvious benefit for character-limited content (like ad copy), but it applies to any and all content marketing. Whether it’s your email copy, blog post, or white paper, there’s never room for clutter. 

Follow these tips for clear and value-packed copy your readers will appreciate and remember (and also for you to become a better writer overall).

6. Remove redundant or empty adverbs

These not only add unnecessary words to your copy, but they also sound more desperate than authoritative. Let’s have a look.

Unnecessary adverbs:

carefully curated → curatedstressful crisis → crisisimportant priorities → prioritiesover exaggerate → exaggerate

Unnecessary and desperate adverbs: 

critically important → criticalpowerfully effective → powerful
extremely helpful → helpful

Adverbs aren’t altogether bad. Here are some great blog post titles:

“Surprisingly easy” tells me this post isn’t going to give the usual rundown. I’d click.

Here’s another one:

“Ferociously unique” is playfully bold. I’m interested.

In these cases, the extra words are effective, not destructive. Just make sure you deliver on your promise

7. Replace adjectives with stronger nouns

Another great copywriting tip: Replace adjective-noun pairs with just one, more powerful noun. 

difficult situation → dilemma
tough spot → bind
specific group → niche
small difference → nuance
close connection → rapport

One less word. Lots more power.

8. Remove nonwords

The SERP for “nonwords” is rough. I may or may not have had an editorial identity crisis while I was in there. 

But you have to remember that we’re not talking about essays or news articles here. Marketing and ad copy is versatile. It can be technical, conversational, dry, or friendly, depending on its purpose/place. So here are a few examples.

“So you can”

Okay: Let us do the legwork so you can get back to running your business.Not okay: Use these tips so you can improve your writing. Replace with: Use these tips to improve your writing.

“Thing”

Okay: Here are six things you can do to prevent a cyber attack.Not okay: Stressing over deadlines is a thing we can relate to. Replace with: We can all relate to stressing over deadlines.

“Really”

Okay: Learn what it really takes to write copy that sells.Not okay: With our reporting features, you can really focus on metrics that matter.Replace with: With our reporting features, you can focus on metrics that matter.

9. Say ta-ta to tauto(logy)

Turns out there’s a technical term for fluff. Tautology is the practice of saying the same thing more than once but with different words to try to look like you’re not. Let’s call it black-hat redundancy.

This, for example, is tautology at its finest:

121 words that tell me you have no idea what you’re talking about. 

44 words that convince me I need personalization in my ecommerce strategy. Sold.

10. Save it for another page

First of all, “world-class” is not a selling point. It’s an empty adjective (also something we’ll get to later). Intellum (cringe) uses this on its homepage:

Now if you are actually world-class (Iwhich Intellum is), back it up—but not in your home page, solutions page, or landing pages. Say it in a sentence and then use a “learn more” button to show credibility and link to long-form (but also concise!) copy that proves it.

11. Be blunt

Take concision to the extreme with one or two-word sentences. For example: 

“Video Editing Software. Free Download. Easy Movie Editor.” 

Plain. But to the point and exactly the words I’d search (tip #2). Plus, “free” and “easy” are staples in any list you find of words that sell.

“7 days. 7 dollars. Full access.” 

Catchy. Quick. No-nonsense. Sold.

How to write CREDIBLE copy that sells

With clear and concise copy, your readers can get right to the point you’re making. But is it a point that sells? Follow these tips to make sure you’re not just saying, but selling.

12. Avoid empty testimonials

While this isn’t copy you write, it’s copy that sells. We’ve all seen 5-star reviews or testimonials like “ServicePro was great. I’ll definitely use them again.”

Positive? Yes. Credible? No.

In the example below from Akvertise website, you get a specific person complimenting a specific employee on specific actions.

Instead of just asking for a review, ask through email if you can get a quote from them for your website. Beause there’s no on-the-spot pressure and they’re typing it out, they’ll put more careful thought into it, and knowing that it will appear on your website, they’ll make sure it makes them look good too.

13. Share statements, not opinions

Outwardly trying to convince with your product description copywriting has the opposite effect. Stick with simple statements.

For example, you might use an adjective like “fastest installation” in a header to attract your visitor, but plain Jane statements like “one day installation”  and “24 hours” work better in the feature breakdown.

14. Replace adjectives with verbs

Rather than describe your product as all-in-one, easy to use, powerful, etc., to promote your product or service, use verbs to communicate exactly what they can do with your product. Take a look at Sleeknote’s product copy:

11 verbs: collect, grow, drive, assist, get in touch, make, sell, increase, guide, send, invite.

4 adjectives: segmented, quality, right, exact.

Save the inspirational copy for your mission statement. Plain statements that get right to the point are more credible than adjectives that try to convince. 

15. Nix empty adjectives

Continuing on in this anti-adjective campaign, take a look at this example (adapted from David Meerman Scott):

“We have assembled surgical and clinical expertise second to none, have a state-of-the-art trauma center, developed sophisticated minimally invasive techniques, and call on innovative training and technology to ensure the highest level of patient safety and quality of care. These clinical initiatives, a thriving research enterprise, and an unparalleled medical education program all enable [Hospital Z] to fulfill our mission.”

This copy should be broken up into segments with credible information…perhaps bullets (tip #5)?

• Our trauma center uses minimally invasive techniques like laparoscopic surgery to shorten your recovery period.• With our in-house research teams and Harvard-trained surgeons, you can rest assured you’ll get the highest quality of care.

Easier to read (tip #1), FABulous (tip # 3), and credible. Sold.

16. Use data

When it comes to credibility, nothing beats data.

Again, even if customers don’t know what these numbers mean, they see that cybereason has proof. Numbers sell.

How to write COMPELLING copy that sells

Compelling copy is magnetic.

(PS: In this section, adjectives are our friends.)

17. Don’t be afraid to get technical

As you can see from the bullets above, adjectives aren’t always bad. But if you’re going to use them, make them specific and factual. Words like “durable,” “secure,” “highly trained,” and “unique” work, but can you get more specific to build more confidence in potential buyers? Y.

strong → titanium-based
durable → industrial-grade   secure → NP2-encrypted (made that up)trained → DSFA-certified (that one too)
unique → proprietary
safe → flame-retardent

It’s technical, but this type of copy sells, even if customers don’t need to know what it all means.

18. Read their minds

Think about the assumptions, hopes, doubts, or fears your buyer personas have, like:

I’m not an online business so I don’t really need a website.
What the heck does amortize even mean?
If I hear [buzzword, cliche, etc.] one more time…
Native ads are like display ads, right?

Capture real thoughts your target audience has, and create an immediate personal connection that draws them in.

Thoughts can be among the most compelling headlines.

19. Make it urgent

Urgency is the hallmark of selling. As Ray Edwards puts it in his book How to Write Copy That Sells, “You need to place a dollar cost on this failure to solve the problem when at all possible.”

This means not only using words like “now,” “today,” or “hurry” in your CTAs, but communicating to your readers the cost of indecision or ignoring the problem. 

20. Use the power of emotion

Factual copy sells, but not all sales copy is factual. Emotions hold equal power. And you can do even better than the fear-based ad above. No matter your product or service, it all comes down to pain points and desires, which come down to all kinds of emotions. For example:

We sell: marketing services.

So our customers can: grow their business.

Because they want to feel:

Confident that they’re using the right strategies.
Excited about getting new customers.
Proud of what they’ve built.
And they don’t want to feel:

Overwhelmed at the number of strategies out there.
Worried about missing opportunities.
Defeated by competitors.
Translate your customers’ pain points and desires into emotions they both want and don’t want to feel, then either elicit them with your copy or use the emotion word itself. This is particularly helpful for storytelling (which we’ll get into shortly).

Like keywords (tip #2), emotional marketing copy speaks your customers’ language. When they feel like you truly understand their problems and desires, they’ll feel more confident that you can solve them. In other words, it’s an emotional way of gaining credibility.

21. Try out power verbs

Here’s a simple copywriting exercise. Write a plain sentence starting with “We sell…”

Now, replace the word sell with captivating verbs like:

• Eliminate
• Empower
• Level up
• Inspire
• Reduce
• Unlock

Continuing with our example above:

We sell marketing services.

• We eliminate the guesswork of coming up with a marketing plan.• We empower business owners to compete with big businesses.• We level up your online presence.• We inspire business owners to make a mark in their community.• We reduce the amount of time you spend on growing your business.• We unlock your business’s full potential.

You get the idea. I’ve got lots of compelling verbs in my list of 273 words for writing emotional marketing copy. Pick out your favorites and fill in the blanks.

22. Make it about them

Notice in the example above, every statement starts with “we.” That was just an exercise to help you come up with compelling concepts, but the copy itself should be about your customers about 90% of the time. 

With our Builder—a Google Chrome Extension—you can create flows and track new events with a few clicks. Open the Buidler on top of your product, create something beautiful, and wow your users!

“You” is used eight times. “Our” is used once.

In the initial stages of the funnel, customers care less about what you do and more about what they want to do. Later on when they’re doing their vetting, copywriting about what you offer and how you do it makes more sense.

23. Use storytelling (okay but what does that MEAN)

If copy that sells is concise and to the point, then how the heck does storytelling fit into the picture? (See what I did there (tip #18).) Enter copywriting formulas. For example:

Before-after bridge formula

Here, you accurately describe your customer’s current state. Then their desired state. And then introduce your business as the way to get there. 

Image source

Here’s the before-after-bridge formula in a tweet. 

A 12-word story that sells. Image source

Problem-agitate-solution formula

Introduce the problem your readers experience, use emotional words and phrases to agitate the problem, then offer your business as the solution.

Image source

And there you have it. Compelling marketing copy. that uses storytelling while staying clear, concise, and credible. All boxes checked. Try this in your Tweets, email copy, blog posts, case studies, and more.

24. Try catchy statements

This could work with homepage headers or even Facebook ad copy. You can use the contrast approach, such as with “One source of truth. Endless solutions.” 

(Note that this isn’t a bombastic claim (tip #10). Airtable is not claiming to be the one source of truth. Businesses use it to collect information and tasks in one place so that everyone has one source of truth.)

More ways to write catchy copy include alliteration, rhyming (ideally subtle to reduce the cheese factor), or taking the “not this, but that” approach:

25. Final tip: be careful with assumptions

Okay so, we all know not to overtly patronize or belittle our prospects for obvious reasons. But words like “we all know” and “obvious” can be subtly destructive if used in the wrong manner.

I said it above because it’s a cultural norm not to belittle or patronize. So this word choice serves to not insult your readers’ intelligence. But in the case below, the same words can have the opposite effect.

Everyone knows that drip email campaigns can increase conversions, but how do you create them? What tools do you need?

Maybe your reader doesn’t know this. No, they aren’t going to feel consciously offended, but they might have a micro-moment of feeling inadequate or like they’re in the wrong place. Here’s a better alternative:

If you’re like most marketers, you’re always looking for ways to increase conversions with your emails. Drip campaigns make this possible. But how do you create them?

So be careful with assumptive words and phrases that hold power to insult or acknowledge your readers’ intelligence.

You now have what it takes to write copy that sells (anything)

The fifth in the five Cs is “call to action”, but if you’ve followed all the tips above, this will be the easy part. Plus, we’ve got a post on that. 

And by definition, all copywriting is a call to action. Trust what I have to say. Stop scrolling and read this post. Click on my ad. Buy my product. So you don’t need to “always be closing,” but you do need to “always be selling.” And now you know how to do it.

Follow the larger discussion about this topic at…: Read More

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You May Also Like

57 Easy & Engaging August Marketing Ideas (With Examples!)

Inspirational Instagram posts say August is the Sunday of summer (cursive font over sunset photo). Someecards says August is a whole month of Sunday nights.

We say August is 30 days of opportunities for creative marketing. And we have over 50 ideas to prove it. So today, we’re coming at you with:

A list of August awareness causes, themes, national days, and holidays.
57 creative ideas for incorporating them into your articles, posts, events, and promotions.
Real examples of these August marketing ideas in action.
Let’s get into it.

August awareness

Eye Health Month
Family Fun Month
Happiness Happens Month
International Peace Month
Back to School Month
Wellness Month
August national days

See the full list at the bottom of this post!

For community-friendly marketing

Night Out Day (First Tuesday)
Garage Sale Day (Second Saturday)
Bowling Day (Second Saturday)
Senior Citizens Day (Aug 21)
For positive/inspirational marketing:

Friendship Day  (First Sunday)
Purple Heart Day (Aug 7)
Happiness Happens Day (Aug 8)
Be An Angel Day (Aug 22)
Just Because Day (Aug 27)
For social awareness marketing

WebMistress Day (Aug 26)
Women’s Equality Day (Aug 26)
For straight-up marketing

National Dollar Day (Aug 8)
National Thrift Shop Day (Aug 17)
August marketing ideas

As you can see from the different categories of observances, you can appeal to all kinds of emotions in your marketing. Use these ideas to connect with your audience in a more meaningful way than any of your competitors.

1. Family Fun Month

Partner up with nearby attractions and offer coupons.
Share a blog post or email newsletter roundup of your favorite family-friendly spots in town.
If your target audience is parents: Write a post on how to actually have family fun month in the depressing last days of summer when your kids are at each others’ throats and you’ve had no alone time in weeks (emotional marketing opp?).
Team up with other local businesses in town and run a family fun night. Photographers can offer family portraits (before little Jane gets a butterfly plastered to her face), restaurants can provide the food (and coupons to get them through their doors), and other businesses (like preschools) can set up informational (but fun) tables.
Clothing companies, run a series of sales each week for men, women, babies, and tweens.

2. Black Business Month

Black Business Month was founded by John William Templeton and Frederick E. Jordan in 2004. Use this as an opportunity not to just support the Black-owned businesses, but to get into the habit of doing it year-round.

Retailers: Take the 15% Pledge and start selling products made by Black-owned businesses. You can use the Support Black-Owned Businesses Directory to find Black-owned businesses near you.
B2B businesses: interview a Black business owner and share their tips on running a business, overcoming prejudice, or dealing with challenges your clients commonly face.
Any business: show your followers how to support Black businesses.

Black-owned businesses: make use of Google’s and now Insta’s “Black-owned” attribute tag.

3. Back to School Month

Back to school season and January are friends. Go wild with all the fresh-start, back-in-gear, goal-setting themes you used in your January marketing (repurposing opp?)

Salons, offer special deals on back-to-school haircuts.
Spas, invite parents in for a much-needed massage after a long summer.
Schools and after-school programs, offer early bird registration deals.
Personal trainers or fitness centers, offer discount packages.
Dentists or nutritionists can encourage appointments or give healthy tips.
Run a re-engagement campaign to bring back any customers who went quiet over the summer.
Check out more back-to-school marketing ideas here.

4. Simplify Your Life Week (August 1-7)

According to Amazon, “seeking simpler living” is the latest trend in consumer behavior. As a business owner, take this time to clean out clutter (virtual and physical), and organize your mind and workplace before the September storm hits.

As for marketing ideas:

Productivity tool providers could offer a free trial during this week.
You could share a roundup of tools or apps you use (or have deleted) to simplify your life.
Interior designers can share their organization tricks.
Break down a complex topic into plain English for your audience.
Life is as broad as it gets, so anything related to simplifying works here.

5. Friendship Day (Aug 2)

This day gives a good excuse for promoting referral programs and running BOGO sales promotions. You might also use catchy taglines like “You never know how many friends you have until you own [the product you provide].”

6. National Dollar Day (Aug 8)

On this day in 1786, the US monetary system was established. A nice history lesson, but also a great marketing opportunity. 

Use a money-saving-themed blog post to teach your audience how to save a dollar (or hundreds).
Take a dollar off your (low-priced) products.
Offer something for just $1.
7. National Book Lovers Day (Aug 9)

There are readers in every audience. Share a post on social media recommending your favorite reads, top industry influencer authors, or asking for recommendations from your followers. Your audience likes opportunities to share their input, you like post engagement, everyone wins.

8. Blame Someone Else Day – First Friday the 13th of the Year (August 13, 2021)

Toss the core values aside today and letterrip. Don’t actually do that. But you can have fun with this one.

“When working in a book store you learn that sometimes books are just going to fall over. Usually on their own or sometimes because of…other reasons (*cough*Ryan*cough).
Happy National Blame Someone Else Day!
(No books were harmed in the making of this post).”
“Friday the 13th: Me-ow.National Blame Someone Else Day: You-ow”
“It’s okay to indulge, you can blame us!”

Or get serious…

Or use it as a creative way to celebrate a company milestone and thank your customers. Write a customer appreciation email, blaming them for your having to bring on more employees to keep up with the demand, and for your having to move to a bigger office, and your having to choose the signature drink to serve at your party celebrating your 1000th customer…and so on.

9. National Relaxation Day (August 15th)

It is National Wellness Month, after all. Ideas:

Spas and salons can offer discounts, or even volunteer to visit a local office and give short chair massages.
Restaurants can promote signature drinks as a way to kick back and relax.
Yoga instructors can run free sessions for offices.
YOU can close up shop early to allow employees to enjoy some hard-earned rest.
10. National Spirit of ’45 Day (second Sunday in August)

On August 14, 1945, President Truman announced the end of WWII. The national pride, can-do spirit, and eagerness to step up and play their part is not only what made this victory possible but also that which laid the groundwork for future generations. The Spirit of ‘45 is a great platform for inspirational blog posts, emails, and social media posts.

11. World Humanitarian Day (Aug 19)

On World Humanitarian Day, we recognize those who lost their lives working for humanitarian causes. Incorporate this into your marketing by:

Donating proceeds to a humanitarian organization near you.
Encouraging your audience to do something good.
Sharing quotes from modern-day humanitarians like Eddie Aijuka.

This modern-day humanitarian is tackling Africa’s electricity crisis. (Image source)

There’s nothing wrong with a Mother Theresa or Gandhi quote, but featuring newer individuals provides an opportunity for both you and your audience to learn about the current crises the world is facing.

12. Senior Citizens Day (Aug 21)

Even though these folks get year-round senior discounts, why not throw an extra one in the mix on this day?

Senior living communities, host an open house barbeque on this day to honor your residents and give potential residents (or their adult children) a chance to check you out.
Local businesses, contact local senior centers to see if you can sponsor or cater an event, or even stop by with free manicures to brighten up someone’s day.
13. Secondhand Wardrobe Day (Aug 25)

Many local secondhand stores are part of nonprofits that fund needs in the community or even worldwide. Consider running a clothing drive to give your audience the opportunity to make a difference while cleaning out their wardrobe (perhaps to simplify their lives…see #4).

Or, for businesses NOT in the clothing industry, publish mission-statement-friendly posts like these:

14. National WebMistress Day (Aug 26)

This holiday recognizes women in web development. Recognize #womenwhocode, do an employee spotlight on a female developer, or donate to learnerships like GirlCode

15. National Just Because Day (Aug 27)

The creative marketing possibilities are endless for this day.

Send your email subscribers a promo code just because you appreciate them.
Encourage your patrons to buy that outfit (or any product you sell), book that ticket, or do something spontaneous for no reason other than because you can.
Go against this post on how to write copy that sells and promote something with “just because”—no features or benefits.
Inspire your audience to do a random act of kindness. Just because.
Run a giveaway that not only ramps up engagement but sparks an inspirational comment thread your followers will enjoy.
Write a post on X (inspirational) things to do just because.
16. Get involved with state/county fairs

Many state fairs happen in the fall, so plan ahead and see if you can get on the list!

Be a web sponsor—get your logo on their website (good for a backlink).
Be a vendor—food, tables, bouncy houses, and more.
Donate an auction or raffle item.
17. Plan for Labor Day

More of a tip than an idea, but get your Labor Day marketing in order, especially if you’re running a special only during that weekend. September sneaks up fast! 

Summer is ending, but August marketing must go on

Whether you’re heading into fall with gusto or dragging your feet, your marketing needs to stay consistent and strong! Use these ideas to engage your audience, attract more customers, and stand out above your competitors. And now, as promised, the expanded list of August national days.

August national days—expanded list

All things family

National Sisters Day – First Sunday in August
Respect for Parents Day (Aug 1)
American Family Day – First Sunday in August
Sons and Daughters Day (Aug 11)
Middle Child Day (Aug 12)
Vertical specific

Shapewear Day (Aug 10)
Secondhand Wardrobe Day (Aug 25)
Brazilian Blowout Day (Aug 21)
Tooth Fairy Day (Aug 22)
Community

Night Out Day (First Tuesday)
Garage Sale Day – Second Saturday in August
Senior Citizens Day (Aug 21)
Bowling Day (Second Saturday)
Positive/inspirational

Friendship Day (First Sunday)
Girlfriends Day (Aug 1)
Happiness Happens Day (Aug 8)
Global Sleep Under The Stars Night  (Aug 8)
Be An Angel Day (Aug 22)
Just Because Day (Aug 27)
Nonprofit Day (Aug 17)
Patriotic

Purple Heart Day (Aug 7)
Spirit of ’45 Day (Second Sunday in August)
Navajo Code Talkers Day
Aviation Day (Aug 19)
Park Service Founders Day (Aug 25)
Ride The Wind Day (Aug 23)
Social

WebMistress Day (Aug 26)
Women’s Equality Day (Aug 26)
Fun/funny

Grab Some Nuts Day (Aug 3)
Underwear Day (Aug 5)
Water Balloon Day (First Friday in August)
Lazy Day (Aug 10)
Tell a Joke Day (Aug 16)
Sneak Some Zucchini Into Your Neighbor’s Porch Day (Aug 8)
I LOVE My Feet Day! (Aug 17)
Blame Someone Else Day (First Friday the 13th of the year (Aug 13 in 2021))
International Beer Day (First Friday in August)
Beach Day (Aug 30)
Mail Order Catalog Day (Aug 18)
Niche/nostalgia

Power Rangers Day (Aug 26)
Book Lovers Day (Aug 9)
Left-Handers Day (Aug 13)
Dog appreciation

Work Like A Dog Day (Aug 5)
Never Bean Better Day (Aug 22)
Dog Day (Aug 26)
Totally irrelevant but nostalgic
International Mahjong Day (Aug 1)
Compassionate

Relaxation Day (Aug 15)
Thoughtful Day  (Aug 28)
Grief Awareness Day (Aug 30)
Rainbow Bridge Remembrance Day (Aug 28)
Sales

National Dollar Day (Aug 8)
National Thrift Shop Day (Aug 17)
[Lots] more marketing ideas

Here’s our full series of marketing ideas for every month of the year:

15 January Marketing Ideas to Start the New Year with a Bang
20 Fabulous (and Affordable) February Marketing Ideas
30+ Creative and Cost-Friendly March Marketing Ideas
20+ Free April Marketing Ideas to Freshen Up Your Content Calendar
50+ May Marketing Ideas for Any Business or Budget
50+ Free June Marketing Ideas for Sizzlin’ Hot Campaigns
37 Free and Creative July Marketing Ideas (With Examples!)
17+ Free and Creative September Marketing Ideas
21+ Free and Effective October Marketing Ideas
19 Simple Yet Superb November Marketing Ideas (with Examples)
20 Super-Festive December Marketing Ideas
And finally, for a year’s worth of marketing ideas, check out this marketing calendar template from our friends at LOCALiQ.

Inspirational Instagram posts say August is the Sunday of summer (cursive font over sunset photo). Someecards says August is a whole month of Sunday nights.

We say August is 30 days of opportunities for creative marketing. And we have over 50 ideas to prove it. So today, we’re coming at you with:

A list of August awareness causes, themes, national days, and holidays.
57 creative ideas for incorporating them into your articles, posts, events, and promotions.
Real examples of these August marketing ideas in action.

Let’s get into it.

August awareness

Eye Health Month
Family Fun Month
Happiness Happens Month
International Peace Month
Back to School Month
Wellness Month

August national days

See the full list at the bottom of this post!

For community-friendly marketing

Night Out Day (First Tuesday)
Garage Sale Day (Second Saturday)
Bowling Day (Second Saturday)
Senior Citizens Day (Aug 21)

For positive/inspirational marketing:

Friendship Day  (First Sunday)
Purple Heart Day (Aug 7)
Happiness Happens Day (Aug 8)
Be An Angel Day (Aug 22)
Just Because Day (Aug 27)

For social awareness marketing

WebMistress Day (Aug 26)
Women’s Equality Day (Aug 26)

For straight-up marketing

National Dollar Day (Aug 8)
National Thrift Shop Day (Aug 17)

August marketing ideas

As you can see from the different categories of observances, you can appeal to all kinds of emotions in your marketing. Use these ideas to connect with your audience in a more meaningful way than any of your competitors.

1. Family Fun Month

Partner up with nearby attractions and offer coupons.
Share a blog post or email newsletter roundup of your favorite family-friendly spots in town.
If your target audience is parents: Write a post on how to actually have family fun month in the depressing last days of summer when your kids are at each others’ throats and you’ve had no alone time in weeks (emotional marketing opp?).
Team up with other local businesses in town and run a family fun night. Photographers can offer family portraits (before little Jane gets a butterfly plastered to her face), restaurants can provide the food (and coupons to get them through their doors), and other businesses (like preschools) can set up informational (but fun) tables.
Clothing companies, run a series of sales each week for men, women, babies, and tweens.

2. Black Business Month

Black Business Month was founded by John William Templeton and Frederick E. Jordan in 2004. Use this as an opportunity not to just support the Black-owned businesses, but to get into the habit of doing it year-round.

Retailers: Take the 15% Pledge and start selling products made by Black-owned businesses. You can use the Support Black-Owned Businesses Directory to find Black-owned businesses near you.
B2B businesses: interview a Black business owner and share their tips on running a business, overcoming prejudice, or dealing with challenges your clients commonly face.
Any business: show your followers how to support Black businesses.

Black-owned businesses: make use of Google’s and now Insta’s “Black-owned” attribute tag.

3. Back to School Month

Back to school season and January are friends. Go wild with all the fresh-start, back-in-gear, goal-setting themes you used in your January marketing (repurposing opp?)

Salons, offer special deals on back-to-school haircuts.
Spas, invite parents in for a much-needed massage after a long summer.
Schools and after-school programs, offer early bird registration deals.
Personal trainers or fitness centers, offer discount packages.
Dentists or nutritionists can encourage appointments or give healthy tips.
Run a re-engagement campaign to bring back any customers who went quiet over the summer.
Check out more back-to-school marketing ideas here.

4. Simplify Your Life Week (August 1-7)

According to Amazon, “seeking simpler living” is the latest trend in consumer behavior. As a business owner, take this time to clean out clutter (virtual and physical), and organize your mind and workplace before the September storm hits.

As for marketing ideas:

Productivity tool providers could offer a free trial during this week.
You could share a roundup of tools or apps you use (or have deleted) to simplify your life.
Interior designers can share their organization tricks.
Break down a complex topic into plain English for your audience.

Life is as broad as it gets, so anything related to simplifying works here.

5. Friendship Day (Aug 2)

This day gives a good excuse for promoting referral programs and running BOGO sales promotions. You might also use catchy taglines like “You never know how many friends you have until you own [the product you provide].”

6. National Dollar Day (Aug 8)

On this day in 1786, the US monetary system was established. A nice history lesson, but also a great marketing opportunity

Use a money-saving-themed blog post to teach your audience how to save a dollar (or hundreds).
Take a dollar off your (low-priced) products.
Offer something for just $1.

7. National Book Lovers Day (Aug 9)

There are readers in every audience. Share a post on social media recommending your favorite reads, top industry influencer authors, or asking for recommendations from your followers. Your audience likes opportunities to share their input, you like post engagement, everyone wins.

8. Blame Someone Else Day – First Friday the 13th of the Year (August 13, 2021)

Toss the core values aside today and letterrip. Don’t actually do that. But you can have fun with this one.

“When working in a book store you learn that sometimes books are just going to fall over. Usually on their own or sometimes because of…other reasons (*cough*Ryan*cough).
Happy National Blame Someone Else Day!
(No books were harmed in the making of this post).”

“Friday the 13th: Me-ow.
National Blame Someone Else Day: You-ow”
“It’s okay to indulge, you can blame us!”

Or get serious…

Or use it as a creative way to celebrate a company milestone and thank your customers. Write a customer appreciation email, blaming them for your having to bring on more employees to keep up with the demand, and for your having to move to a bigger office, and your having to choose the signature drink to serve at your party celebrating your 1000th customer…and so on.

9. National Relaxation Day (August 15th)

It is National Wellness Month, after all. Ideas:

Spas and salons can offer discounts, or even volunteer to visit a local office and give short chair massages.
Restaurants can promote signature drinks as a way to kick back and relax.
Yoga instructors can run free sessions for offices.
YOU can close up shop early to allow employees to enjoy some hard-earned rest.

10. National Spirit of ’45 Day (second Sunday in August)

On August 14, 1945, President Truman announced the end of WWII. The national pride, can-do spirit, and eagerness to step up and play their part is not only what made this victory possible but also that which laid the groundwork for future generations. The Spirit of ‘45 is a great platform for inspirational blog posts, emails, and social media posts.

11. World Humanitarian Day (Aug 19)

On World Humanitarian Day, we recognize those who lost their lives working for humanitarian causes. Incorporate this into your marketing by:

Donating proceeds to a humanitarian organization near you.
Encouraging your audience to do something good.
Sharing quotes from modern-day humanitarians like Eddie Aijuka.

This modern-day humanitarian is tackling Africa’s electricity crisis. (Image source)

There’s nothing wrong with a Mother Theresa or Gandhi quote, but featuring newer individuals provides an opportunity for both you and your audience to learn about the current crises the world is facing.

12. Senior Citizens Day (Aug 21)

Even though these folks get year-round senior discounts, why not throw an extra one in the mix on this day?

Senior living communities, host an open house barbeque on this day to honor your residents and give potential residents (or their adult children) a chance to check you out.
Local businesses, contact local senior centers to see if you can sponsor or cater an event, or even stop by with free manicures to brighten up someone’s day. 

13. Secondhand Wardrobe Day (Aug 25)

Many local secondhand stores are part of nonprofits that fund needs in the community or even worldwide. Consider running a clothing drive to give your audience the opportunity to make a difference while cleaning out their wardrobe (perhaps to simplify their lives…see #4).

Or, for businesses NOT in the clothing industry, publish mission-statement-friendly posts like these:

14. National WebMistress Day (Aug 26)

This holiday recognizes women in web development. Recognize #womenwhocode, do an employee spotlight on a female developer, or donate to learnerships like GirlCode

15. National Just Because Day (Aug 27)

The creative marketing possibilities are endless for this day.

Send your email subscribers a promo code just because you appreciate them.
Encourage your patrons to buy that outfit (or any product you sell), book that ticket, or do something spontaneous for no reason other than because you can.
Go against this post on how to write copy that sells and promote something with “just because”—no features or benefits. 
Inspire your audience to do a random act of kindness. Just because.
Run a giveaway that not only ramps up engagement but sparks an inspirational comment thread your followers will enjoy.
Write a post on X (inspirational) things to do just because.

16. Get involved with state/county fairs

Many state fairs happen in the fall, so plan ahead and see if you can get on the list!

Be a web sponsor—get your logo on their website (good for a backlink).
Be a vendor—food, tables, bouncy houses, and more.
Donate an auction or raffle item.

17. Plan for Labor Day

More of a tip than an idea, but get your Labor Day marketing in order, especially if you’re running a special only during that weekend. September sneaks up fast! 

Summer is ending, but August marketing must go on

Whether you’re heading into fall with gusto or dragging your feet, your marketing needs to stay consistent and strong! Use these ideas to engage your audience, attract more customers, and stand out above your competitors. And now, as promised, the expanded list of August national days.

August national days—expanded list

All things family

National Sisters Day – First Sunday in August
Respect for Parents Day (Aug 1)
American Family Day – First Sunday in August
Sons and Daughters Day (Aug 11)
Middle Child Day (Aug 12)

Vertical specific

Shapewear Day (Aug 10)
Secondhand Wardrobe Day (Aug 25)
Brazilian Blowout Day (Aug 21)
Tooth Fairy Day (Aug 22)

Community

Night Out Day (First Tuesday)
Garage Sale Day – Second Saturday in August
Senior Citizens Day (Aug 21)
Bowling Day (Second Saturday)

Positive/inspirational

Friendship Day (First Sunday)
Girlfriends Day (Aug 1)
Happiness Happens Day (Aug 8)
Global Sleep Under The Stars Night  (Aug 8)
Be An Angel Day (Aug 22)
Just Because Day (Aug 27)
Nonprofit Day (Aug 17)

Patriotic

Purple Heart Day (Aug 7)
Spirit of ’45 Day (Second Sunday in August)
Navajo Code Talkers Day
Aviation Day (Aug 19)
Park Service Founders Day (Aug 25)
Ride The Wind Day (Aug 23)

Social

WebMistress Day (Aug 26)
Women’s Equality Day (Aug 26)

Fun/funny

Grab Some Nuts Day (Aug 3)
Underwear Day (Aug 5)
Water Balloon Day (First Friday in August)
Lazy Day (Aug 10)
Tell a Joke Day (Aug 16)
Sneak Some Zucchini Into Your Neighbor’s Porch Day (Aug 8)
I LOVE My Feet Day! (Aug 17)
Blame Someone Else Day (First Friday the 13th of the year (Aug 13 in 2021))
International Beer Day (First Friday in August)
Beach Day (Aug 30)
Mail Order Catalog Day (Aug 18)

Niche/nostalgia

Power Rangers Day (Aug 26)
Book Lovers Day (Aug 9)
Left-Handers Day (Aug 13)

Dog appreciation

Work Like A Dog Day (Aug 5)
Never Bean Better Day (Aug 22)
Dog Day (Aug 26)
Totally irrelevant but nostalgic
International Mahjong Day (Aug 1)

Compassionate

Relaxation Day (Aug 15)
Thoughtful Day  (Aug 28)
Grief Awareness Day (Aug 30)
Rainbow Bridge Remembrance Day (Aug 28)

Sales

National Dollar Day (Aug 8)
National Thrift Shop Day (Aug 17)

[Lots] more marketing ideas

Here’s our full series of marketing ideas for every month of the year:

15 January Marketing Ideas to Start the New Year with a Bang
20 Fabulous (and Affordable) February Marketing Ideas
30+ Creative and Cost-Friendly March Marketing Ideas
20+ Free April Marketing Ideas to Freshen Up Your Content Calendar
50+ May Marketing Ideas for Any Business or Budget
50+ Free June Marketing Ideas for Sizzlin’ Hot Campaigns
37 Free and Creative July Marketing Ideas (With Examples!)
17+ Free and Creative September Marketing Ideas
21+ Free and Effective October Marketing Ideas
19 Simple Yet Superb November Marketing Ideas (with Examples)
20 Super-Festive December Marketing Ideas

And finally, for a year’s worth of marketing ideas, check out this marketing calendar template from our friends at LOCALiQ.

Follow the larger discussion about this topic at…: Read More

Is this Topic of Search Engine Optimization an Important Issue for You?

Contact us Today to discuss Your Concerns and Options!

People also ask questions about:

local seo firms
local seo marketing
local search engine marketing services
local seo agency

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How to: Create a Better Website

How to Create a Better Website !

Table of Contents

  • What clients want: Your website needs to be built around the needs of clients.
  • Common mistakes: Many of the issues for legal websites apply to all websites. Design over content is the most pressing concern – websites that look beautiful but do not allow users to find what they are looking for simply and easily are a common complaint.
  • SEO – the basics: Search engine optimisation is the process of making sure a website comes up as high as possible in a search engine’s organic (unpaid) results.
  • Security issues: The most important thing a firm can do to ensure its website is secure is to use the HTTPS protocol, rather than HTTP, at the start of its URL.

How to: create a better website
Follow the larger discussion about this topic at…: Read More


Is this Topic of Website Design an Important Issue for You?

Contact us Today to discuss Your Concerns and Options about Website Design!


People also ask

  • How much does it cost to design a website?
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  • How much does it cost to hire a designer to build a website?
  • What are the 5 principles of web design?

Related Searches:

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Multilingual SEO: An Untapped Resource for Local Businesses

Multilingual SEO: An Untapped Resource for Local Businesses

60 million people—almost a quarter of the US population—speak a non-English language as their mother tongue. And if they’re speaking it, you can be sure they’re searching with it, too!

In every major US city, a large proportion of non-English speakers live, work, and shop. Yet how many local businesses are optimizing their websites for multilingual audiences?


How quickly can you respond to changing market forces?

Marketers are under constant pressure to innovate, change, and drive demand. To be successful, one of the most important skills a marketer can develop is the ability to be agile and quickly respond to changing market forces.

This skill has never been more important than today as marketers strive to be productive and effective while working from our homes under the shadow of a global pandemic. Carefully curated marketing plans that seemed relevant two months ago must be completely reworked.

We’ve found that marketing organizations with a single, unified enterprise work management solution can boost creativity, speed, and agility to help teams iteratively plan and prioritize when things quickly shift.


Looking for Multilingual solution for your office ?

How to Measure Our Success for Local SEO ?

  • SERP (search engine results pages) visibility: this is to check whether how well your website is appearing for the targeted search queries
  • Click-through rate (CTR): this shows your website’s performance within the SERPs.
  • Keyword ranking: this demostrates your website’s rank for targeted keywords necessary for visitor traffic
  • Domain authority (DA): websites with a higher DA perform better

We will setup these metrics before we start and periodically review with you for your success.

So, what are You doing Today?

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How to use Headlines to Help Create and Optimize Content ?

Catchy headline is very important to draw attention of the reader about an article or an advertisement. It should include words and ideas to draw someone’s eye and reader’s interest to read the entire content.

4 Ways to Help You Think Up Engaging Headlines

  • Use a numeric value in your headline
  • Keep it short (8-12 words)
  • Add emotion such as curiosity or anticipation
  • Ask a burning question

Types Of Headlines

  • Flush Left Headline
  • Banner Headline
  • Inverted Pyramid Headline
  • Cross-Line Headline

Fractl’s Growth Specialist shares a guide on how to optimize content through effective headlines. It covers how you can frame, promote, pitch, and sell your content.

The post How to use headlines to help create and optimize content appeared first on Search Engine Watch.
Source: Read More

Content, SEO, content, Content marketing, content optimization, content tips, evergreen content, Google, keyword optimization, long-tail keywords, SERPs

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How-To Content Isn’t Going Anywhere (and What That Means for Your Strategy)

Let’s discuss How-to Content and is working?

Recently, Amanda Milligan posted an interesting article about the how to content, what it means and how it helps.  What caught my eye was the tie from witch burning 500 years ago to CDC how to wash your hands ( now come on, do we really need instructions on how to wash hands? )

Extracting content ideas from circumstances is what exactly illustrates the problem and the opportunity; when you have lemons, make lemonade !

Content is still king.  Good content still goes miles.

So, I am reproducing the article below by Amanda

Posted by Amanda Milligan

I’m a big fan of the Lore podcast, and in a recent episode, the host discussed a book called the Malleus Maleficarum.

Two words starting with the “mal” prefix doesn’t sound super friendly, right?

Well, the book is essentially a guide on how to identify witches and conduct witch trials. It turned out to have quite the horrible impact on society — as we’ve learned in history classes — but the host notes that it’s also one of the first how-tos ever written.

And it was published in 1486, more than 500 years ago.
How-to content isn’t new, and from what I can tell, it isn’t going anywhere. Look at how many search results come back when you narrow content down to titles including “how to.”

It’s not just that there’s a ton of this type of content, either. People want to read it.

The prominence of “how-to” content

My team at Fractl did a study about how different generations search online. We gave nearly 1,000 people this prompt:
You just got engaged! It’s time to start thinking about the wedding, but you’re not sure where to start. What is the first word or phrase you would search using Google or another search engine?
Thirteen percent of all the respondents’ hypothetical searches had “how to” in them, and the youngest respondents — millennials and Gen Zers — used it the most.

It serves as additional proof for what we already suspected: how-to content remains a staple in the content world.

And it makes sense, doesn’t it? How-tos not only lend themselves to the thrill of learning new information online (and the seemingly endless number of things that are available to learn); they also serve as a tool of empowerment. Even if you don’t know how to do something, you can figure it out just by going online and reading/watching/listening to content someone else put together for you.

If people continue to desire this type of content, how can you make sure you’re incorporating it into your content plans accordingly?

Finding how-to opportunities

In some cases, it’s obvious how more how-to content can help your brand. Perhaps you’re a B2B SaaS company with a product designed to help teams collaborate online. You could write how-to articles about improving communication, transitioning to a new chat client, and plenty of other topics.

It’s important to have these articles, because not only do they speak to a direct need of a certain audience, but they’re also directly related to your brand offering. They’re rife with more natural call-to-action opportunities, and they demonstrate your willingness to help solve a problem.

This article by Brembo is a perfect illustration of this.
After the helpful guide, they have a CTA to:
“Just go to the configurator (www.moto.brembo.com) and enter some simple information about your motorcycle such as brand, engine displacement, model and year. The configurator will search through the entire Brembo line and quickly indicate which Brembo products are available for the selected bike, even including the pad compounds.”
And voilà! You have a useful guide that ties directly into your product.
However, the trick is making sure you’re seizing every opportunity and not settling on just the obvious how-tos.

Here are some ways you can find creative new opportunities:
Ask your audience. Run a poll on social media. Survey your email list. Call your customers. Whatever your preferred method, ask what they want to see! Get to know their challenges better so you can create content that will address them.

Research what’s being asked online.

You can start by going to Answer the Public or using BuzzSumo’s Questions tool. Both allow you to see what people are asking across the web regarding topics. But you can also look at similar content that exists and see what people are saying in the comments. Is there any confusion? Any points that still need to be covered?

Talk to your sales team. They’re the ones “on the ground” discussing potential worries and concerns from your clients and customers. If you haven’t already, set up a regular check in with the sales department so you can stay updated on what questions are popping up that the marketing team can answer in its content.

Additionally, for brands that might not have clear ideas for how-to content, it’s important to explore top-of-the-funnel opportunities, which you can do using the same tactics above.

Top-of-the-funnel means that, while the how-to guides might not be directly related to your service offering, they’re still good for introducing your brand to people who are interested in your general industry.

For example, like many other food brands, King Arthur’s Flour has recipes involving flour on their site. However, unlike many other food brands, their article, “How to make high-rising biscuits” has more than 94,000 engagements on Facebook, according to BuzzSumo.

Now, this is arguably middle-of-the-funnel because you need flour to make the biscuits and it’s a flour company creating the content. But people looking this up probably already have flour in their homes. The benefit of creating this content is that now they’re familiar with this brand of flour, and if the recipe goes well, they have more trust in this particular brand.

So, the article doesn’t have to be “how to choose the right type of flour.” It can be something your audience wants to know related to what you offer.

Getting creative with how-to content

Sometimes you want to create a guide that technically might already exist, but you want to do a better job in one way or another.

That’s great! But it means going the extra mile, thinking outside the box, and every other cliche you can think of. And that doesn’t always mean doing something costly or extravagant.

For example, because of the COVID-19 pandemic, the CDC released a piece about how to wash your hands correctly. Rather than sticking to the diagrams you see in restaurant bathrooms, they created a clean list of steps followed by a video showing exactly how to execute each step.

Just the addition of the videos made the content much more valuable to readers.

I also love this article from Taste of Home. I’ve read a million recipes on how to make chocolate chip cookies (what? I have a sweet tooth!), but this is the first time I’ve seen one that helps you adapt a basic recipe to make the best cookie for you.

The simple addition of this graphic adds an entirely new value to the piece that so many other variations lack by offering visual representations of textures for each recipe option.

So how can you achieve the same result?

When you’ve decided on a topic to write about, do the following:
Sum up in one sentence exactly what you want to teach people. Be as specific as possible. This will keep you focused when you’re creatively brainstorming how to execute.

Explore what other how-to content already exists and what they’re lacking. Does the type of content work well for the topic? Is it too long, too confusing, too boring? How can you make yours easier to understand and more interesting?Constantly bookmark inspiration you come across. All kinds of content out there can provide you with creative ideas on how to execute a how-to guide. Put all of the links or images in a Google doc to create a sort of virtual vision board, or make it a habit to go to sites like https://www.reddit.com/r/InternetIsBeautiful/.

Conclusion
Knowing that how-to content is always going to be desired is a great prompt for examining its role in your strategy. Which of your previous how-to pieces have performed the best, which have performed the worst, and what can you learn from both?

Twitter @millanda!

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Why Style Matters in SEO?

A that is chrisp, cogent and consistet appreciates the reader’s intelligence by showing that you respect and want to earn trust of the visitor to the website.  Trust is vital in search engine result pages (SERP) for all your local seo results.

Google’s algorithms have become sophisticated enough that the quality of content has more importance than use of any particular keyword or phrase or string. Thus, the first SERP might not contain an exact match keyword anywhere in the body of the page.

When it comes to marketing your business / website, your writing style matters a lot. Sadly, it gets ignored enough time.

What is important is that your writing be clear, concise and consistent.

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